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Sunday, May 10, 2020 | History

3 edition of Transferring of development rights in the Lake Whatcom Watershed found in the catalog.

Transferring of development rights in the Lake Whatcom Watershed

Transferring of development rights in the Lake Whatcom Watershed

environmental impact assessment

  • 38 Want to read
  • 18 Currently reading

Published by Huxley College of Environmental Studies, Western Washington University in Bellingham, WA .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Land use -- Environmental aspects -- Washington (State) -- Whatcom, Lake, Watershed,
  • Development rights transfer -- Washington (State) -- Whatcom, Lake, Region,
  • Environmental impact analysis -- Washington (State) -- Whatcom, Lake, Region,
  • Whatcom, Lake, Watershed (Wash.) -- Environmental conditions

  • Edition Notes

    Other titlesTransfer of development rights in the Lake Whatcom Watershed
    Statementprepared by Winter 2000 Huxley College EIA class ; lead agency, Huxley College of Environmental Studies ; responsible official, William Summers ; assessment team members, Zak Swannack ... [et al.].
    ContributionsSwannack, Zak., Summers, William C., Huxley College of Environmental Studies.
    The Physical Object
    Pagination1 v. (various pagings) :
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL14507566M
    OCLC/WorldCa45157819

    Lake Whatcom Comprehensive Stormwater Plan Executive Summary Lake Whatcom in Whatcom County, Washington is an important recreational area and water source for the citizens of Bellingham and surrounding suburban and rural watershed is experiencing, nutrient enrichment and algae blooms in the lake, a decline in water. Whatcom County will be considering requesting the transfer of approximately 8, acres of DNR forest board lands in and around the Lake Whatcom Reservoir watershed for use as a park reserve. The proposed park would be developed and managed for passive recreation similar to other County Park areas like the Stimpson Family Nature Reserve.

    The Lake Whatcom watershed is a multi-use watershed with a variety of land and water-based recreation uses. As a result, portions of Lake Whatcom and a number of its tributaries are facing water quality concerns caused by pollutants in stormwater runoff from residential development, agricultural practices, forestry practices, and recreational uses. Batchelor, C. () Protecting the Lake Whatcom Watershed: Transferable Development Rights Whatcom Watch, May issue. Wells, Sherilyn (). How to Lose a Reservoir. Whatcom Watch (Jan., pp. ) (link to last paragraph of Wells) Letter of Philip S. Sharpe Declaration of Sherilyn Wells; OPTIONAL - esp. for planning students.

    Page viii Lake Whatcom Watershed Table ES Sampling Sites, Land Use, and Contaminants of Concern in the Lake Whatcom and Whatcom Creek Watersheds. Site Land Use in Drainage Contaminants of Concern Lake Whatcom Watershed Lake Whatcom Basin 1 Urban residential Mercury, Indeno(1,2,3-c,d)pyrene, Dieldrin, PCBs Lake Whatcom Basin 2 (DW Intake)File Size: 1MB. Transfer of development rights (TDRs) can also be used to increase the number of units from seven to 10 units per acre. To use the TDR density bonus, a property owner can purchase development rights from a Lake Whatcom watershed land owner or use the “fee-in-lieu-of” option.


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Transferring of development rights in the Lake Whatcom Watershed Download PDF EPUB FB2

Watersheds generally drain into a single body of water such as a lake, river, or an ocean. Standards Standards are specific to each of the watershed overlay zones and vary by watershed.

In general the regulations are low impact development standards that are intended to protect a valuable resource, whether it be drinking water or aquatic habitat. Whatcom County during the past 20 years. A formal density transfer procedure was first codified in It has had some use in the Lake Whatcom Watershed as a limited number of development rights have been transferred out of that area.

Most development rights removed from the watershed were purchased, however, and not dependent on a transfer process. Issues affecting water quality in the watershed In the last decade the water quality in Lake Whatcom has been declining much more rapidly than City of Bellingham and Whatcom County officials anticipated.

Increased development in the watershed has led to high levels of phosphorus entering the Size: KB. Watershed description Lake Whatcom is a large natural lake in Whatcom County (Figure ES-1 vicinity map). The outlet of the lake is to Whatcom Creek at the northwest end, where it is regulated by a dam.

During parts of the year when there is sufficient flow in the Middle Fork of the Nooksack River. Inthe lake was targeted for development of a water cleanup plan. The Lake Whatcom cleanup plan, called a “total maximum daily load” (TMDL) analysis under requirements of the federal Clean Water Act, will address low levels of dissolved oxygen (DO) and.

fecal coliform bacteria in Silver Beach and Austin Size: KB. Regulations specific to the Lake Whatcom watershed are designed to protect and sustain the resource as part of the City Council Legacies and Strategic Commitments.

Aquatic Invasive Species Prevention (BMC ) and ()Lake Whatcom Reservoir Regulatory. Logging and mining were major activities in the Lake Whatcom watershed during the late s.

Information reviewed reports that much of the area was logged by the s, and by timber on the immediate shores of Lake Whatcom are exhausted making it necessary to File Size: 1MB. Lake Whatcom Water & Sewer District is taking steps to ensure continued operation of our water & sewer system.

For the most up-to-date information on the District’s response to the current Covid crisis, please scroll down, and consider following our Facebook page to be alerted of updates.

Lake Whatcom Work Plan and responses to comments now available The Bellingham City Council, the Whatcom County Council, and the Lake Whatcom Water and Sewer District Board of Commissioners were slated to vote on final approval of the new Lake PostedPM by City of Bellingham ; CANCELLED: Ma Lake Whatcom Joint Councils and Commission.

Development stormwater runoff does not occur. Seasonal Clearing Limitations On parcels within the Lake Whatcom watershed, clearing activities which expose more than square feet of soil are not permitted from October 1 through May 31 per WCC Development permits may be submitted at any time during the year.

actually have to purchase the development rights. Early successes, such as a pilot project, and public support also go a long way towards achieving successful TDR programs. Chris Behee indicated that the TDR/PDR program in Bellingham benefits the Lake Whatcom Watershed.

PDRs accomplish the same thing as TDRs, but are easier to administer. Located just east of Bellingham. Fishing opportunities include resident Kokanee, Largemouth and Smallmouth bass, and Yellow Perch.

Fishing for resident Coastal Cutthroat Trout is closed due to a decline in abundance caused by siltation from logging and urban activities in their spawning tributaries.

All tributaries and that portion of the lake between Electric Avenue Bridge and the outlet dam. Transfer of residential development rights.

Areas designated in the Comprehensive Plan and assigned a The URM zoningzone districts in the Urban Fringe Subarea, are considered receiving areas for transfer of development rights from the Lake Whatcom watershed sending area.

(Ord. § 1, ). The Lake Whatcom Reservoir is the source of drinking water to o people in Whatcom County, including served by the City of Bellingham. The health of this tremendously important resource is declining, and at a pace that is faster than expected.

Lake Whatcom is the drinking water supply for aboutresidents of Whatcom County, about half the county's population. Lake Whatcom provides drinking water for the City of Bellingham, the Lake Whatcom Water and Sewer District, several smaller water districts and associations, and a few hundred homes that draw water directly from the lake.

Whatcom County has had a TDR program in place since the late ’s to transfer development rights out of the Lake Whatcom Watershed, but it has rarely been used. The County has an existing transfer of development rights (TDR) program and purchase of development rights (PDR) program.

The TDR program is intended to move development rights from the Lake Whatcom Watershed and sensitive environmental areas in the Birch Bay area to urban locations that are more appropriate for growth.

Lake Whatcom watershed and sub-basins (Matthews et al., ) Lake Whatcom is the primary drinking water source for aboutresidents of Whatcom County. The lake is comprised of three sub-basins from which samples are collected in October through December, in February and April through September each year.

There total acres in the Lake Whatcom Watershed. 4, of these are developed, 5, are zoned for development but are currently undeveloped, and 2, are protected under conservation easement, as a result of land use acquisition by the city of Bellingham and private on: Whatcom County, Washington.

Protecting and restoring Lake Whatcom, source of drinking water to overpeople, by building storm water infrastructure and purchasing undeveloped lakefront properties, funded by a watershed storm water utility. X Expanding the Purchase and Transfer of Development Rights programs to protect farm and forest lands.

Protecting and restoring Lake Whatcom, source of drinking water to overpeople, by building storm water inf rastructure and purchasing undeveloped lakefront properties, funded by a watershed storm water utility.

X 2 * Expand ing the Purchase and Transfer of Development Rights programs to protect farm and forest lands. X.A non-profit organization, 'The Initiative Group, Inc', formed by citizens Marian Beddill, Larry Williams, Nancy Grayum, Curtis Wambach and Christ Damitio are trying to preserve the city's drinking water reservoir watershed from urban development, and it's resultant pollution and contamination.

We proposed in that the City of Bellingham acquire the lands in the two watersheds surrounding.Chapter 11 - Environment 2 minimize development, or prohibit inappropriate development in such areas.

voluntary lot consolidation voluntary and w orkable transfer or purchase of development rights, current use taxation, and participation in open space If lots in the Lake Whatcom watershed come available due.